Categories: Farmer Partners

  • Beth Ann Caspersen
    March 18, 2014

    March is Women’s History Month–the perfect time to highlight a new initiative that I helped create: Java Jog for a Cause. The co-founders and I started out as a small group of women in coffee that serendipitously came together through our mutual interests: coffee, and in particular, women in coffee. We wanted to find a meaningful way to highlight the important role that women play in coffee and pair that with health and fitness.

  • Beth Ann Caspersen
    January 23, 2014

    I was in a hot room, sitting in a circle with colorfully dressed Ugandan women representing the 10 primary societies of Gumutindo Coffee Co-op. Right away I knew that I was taking part in something special.

  • Ashley Cheuk
    November 14, 2013
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    I just got back from a weeklong visit to the Dominican Republic, where a group of us--a mix of Equal Exchange staff, food co-op managers, and Interfaith liaisons--visited cacao-growing communities that belong to CONACADO Co-op, an umbrella organization of about 10,000 cacao farmers.

  • Ashley Cheuk
    October 23, 2013
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    Last week, we hosted two managers from cacao co-ops we work with in Peru to source chocolate for our new Organic Chocolate Chips and for our line of Organic Candy Bars. Hildebrando Cárdenas Salazar from Oro Verde co-op and David Contreras from ACOPAGRO co-op visited our headquarters in Massachusetts to learn more about Equal Exchange, meet some of our store accounts, and work on 2014 planning for our USAID grant project with the two co-ops.

  • Small Farmers Big Change
    October 6, 2013

    Ten years ago, Equal Exchange brought a group of food co-op and natural food store representatives to visit CEPICAFE, one of our small farmer coffee co-op partners in northern Peru.  We stayed four days and nights living and working along side the coffee farmers, “helping” them with the harvest.  One of my most fond memories was during lunch following that first full morning (ie 4 hours) picking coffee. We had had a lot of fun, laughing, singing, and telling jokes with the farmers, while they tried to teach us their techniques.  But truth be told, the work is back-breaking, the hike to the farms was exhausting, and the sun was hot.

  • Ashley Cheuk
    October 4, 2013
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    Help us plant 10,000 cacao trees at CONACADO Co-op in the Dominican Republic! Each time a tree is virtually planted at equalexchange.coop/asfg, we'll plant a real one!

  • Dary Goodrich
    August 21, 2013
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    Since our founding in 1986, Equal Exchange has worked with small-scale farmers, because we believe small farmer co-operatives are the heart and soul of Fair Trade.  Though Equal Exchange began as a coffee company, our commitment to small farmers has remained foundational, even as our company and product lines have grown.  For over a decade, we've partnered with farmer co-ops in Latin America to bring you high quality, fairly traded chocolates.
  • Small Farmers Big Change
    August 12, 2013

    The first Fair Trade farmer-owned certification system, referred to as the Small Producer Symbol (SPP, for its Spanish acronym) will arrive this fall on Equal Exchange coffees in food co-ops and natural food stores across the country.  Ten years in the making, the SPP certification system represents the small farmers’ persistent attempt to ensure a more just trade system for their fellow farmers everywhere. The colorful SPP logo will initially appear on Equal Exchange coffee bags and bulk coffee bins, and will soon become more prominent throughout stores.

  • Small Farmers Big Change
    July 11, 2013

    Losing a cow is like having your savings account wiped out. Several animals were lost to the family farmers of the Cooperative José Gabriel Condorcanquí in Peru when this past March, unusually heavy rains fell for a few days and caused small mudslides. The innumerable shade and native trees farmers maintain around their coffee plants limited damage, but for those small-scale growers who lost livestock and stables, the loss can push them to the economic brink.

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